Kentucky has the 2nd. Lowest Alcohol Related traffic death rate in the nation in 2006. 70% of Ky. Traffic Deaths Not Alcohol Related.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported that the per cent of alcohol related traffic deaths in Kentucky in 2006 was 30% of all traffic fatalities.  Only Utah, where a high per cent of its population are Mormons who do not drink alcohol, is lower. Utah had a rate of 24%. The highest per centage of alcohol related traffic deaths in 2006 was in Hawaii where the per cent of alcohol related traffic deaths was 52% 

Ohio was 39%, Indiana was 36%, Illinois was 47%, Tennessee was 40%, West Virginia was 39%. In 2006 there were 25,040 total traffic deaths in the U.S. This was down 880  or  3.4% from 2005. 

Alcohol related traffic deaths in the U.S. for 2006 totaled  17,590  down from 17,602 in 2005. In 2006, an estimated 13,470 people were killed in traffic crashes that involved at least one driver or a motorcycle operator with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 g/dL or above – a decline of 0.8 percent from the 13,582 fatalities in 2005. The NHTSA did not reveal in their national study, how the police determine if the alcohol actually played an influence in the accident which resulted in a death. The statistics only report that one or more of the drivers involved had consumed alcohol. The 2006 Annual Assessment of Motor Vehicle Traffic Crash Fatalities and Injuries shows that 17,602 people were killed in the United States in alcohol-related motor vehicle traffic crashes – essentially unchanged from the 17,590 alcohol related
fatalities in 2005.Kentucky DUI TRAFFIC DEATH statistics:
 

2005 –   Kentucky  985  Total Traffic Deaths
 Of which  311  (32%) were alcohol  related deaths
 
In these traffic death cases,  249  Drivers had a BA level of  .08% or greater.
  2006 –  Kentucky  913 Total Traffic Deaths
  Of which  272   (30%) were alcohol related deaths
 
In these traffic death cases,   222 – Drivers had a BA level of  .08% or greater.  This was a reduction of 27 deaths (-10.8%).
 
_______________________________________
 From 2005 to 2006
  Kentucky had a drop of  72 Total Traffic Deaths (-7.3%) from 2005 to 2006.


 
Kentucky had a drop of 39  Alcohol Related Deaths (-12.5%) from 2005 to 2006.

  Drop of  27 in Driver with .08 or greater (-10.8%)
 

This study can be reviewed at : http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/

 

 

Comments

  1. Bill Adkins
    9:42 am on September 24th, 2007

    ‘Alcohol related’ is :”defined by the United States National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to include any and all vehicular (including bicycle and motorcycle) accidents in which any alcohol has been consumed, or believed to have been consumed, by the driver, a passenger or a pedestrian associated with the accident “:

    “Alcohol-related traffic crashes are defined by the United States National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to include any and all vehicular (including bicycle and motorcycle) accidents in which any alcohol has been consumed, or believed to have been consumed, by the driver, a passenger or a pedestrian associated with the accident. Thus, if a person who has consumed alcohol and has stopped for a red light and is rear-ended by a completely sober but inattentive driver, the accident is listed as alcohol-related, although alcohol had nothing to do with causing the accident. Alcohol-related accidents are often mistakenly confused with alcohol-caused accidents.

    Nationally, 12.8% of all drivers involved in fatal accidents during 2001 are known to have been intoxicated according to the blood alcohol concentration (BAC laws) of their state. This number is based on a systematic examination of the official records of each and every accident involving a fatality during that year in the US.

    The higher number (about 40%) commonly reported in the press refers to accidents defined as alcohol-related as estimated (not measured) by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

    Regardless of disagreements and confusion regarding traffic accidents involving alcohol, they have declined dramatically over the past 25 years in the US.”