Eric Deters files Second Lawsuit in a month naming Kenton Commonwealth Attorney Rob Sanders as Defendant.

 

Independence  attorney Eric Deters has filed a lawsuit on behalf of his client Terry Williams Jr. alleging malicious prosecution by Kenton Commonwealth Attorney Rob Sanders. The suit claims that  criminal charges were brought by Sanders in retaliation for Williams filing a federal civil rights lawsuit against the police. The federal case is pending in U.S. District Court in Covington.

In the Federal civil suit, Williams claims he was shocked more than 20 times by a stun gun, sprayed with a chemical irritant and beaten with baton by the police. He was then taken to the hospital but not arrested. Some of the struggle between Williams and officers was recorded on cameras mounted on police cruisers.  Williams wasn’t criminally charged until after he filed the civil suit in federal court more than 30 days later.

Earlier this month Deters filed another malicious prosecution claim against Sanders which alleges that Sanders improperly prosecuted Dayton School teacher Nicole Howell of a claim that she had sex with a l6 year old male student.  The jury acquitted Howell.

There is apparently no love lost between Deters and Sanders.  Sanders was quoted by the Kentucky Enquirer in his response to the second lawsuit filed in a month against him by Deters clients, and reportedly said:

 “I guess a law license can be a dangerous thing in the hands of a crazy person.”

Deters wrote in a press release. “It is another example, like Nicole Howell, of Rob Sanders and in this case, the Kenton County police, going after someone with great malice.”

The state suit says. defendants, with malice, filed criminal charges against plaintiff without probable cause and with the sole purpose of attempting to coerce plaintiff to drop the civil lawsuit.”   

Williams was ultimately found guilty of disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and second-degree wanton endangerment, a misdemeanor.

Sanders said: “I’ve never been sued by another defense attorney,” …“Obviously, I think everyone can see a pattern here.” … “I don’t know how you sue someone for malicious prosecution when their client already pled guilty.”

 

Williams was convicted of

The state suit in behalf of Williams asks for $5 million in compensatory damages and $10 million in punitive damages.

Another lawsuit was filed by Williams against

COVINGTON – A man who pleaded guilty to crimes relating to his walking naked along Interstate 75 in July 2007 has sued the prosecutor and police who brought the charges against him. Terry Williams Jr.’s attorney, Eric Deters, filed the complaint Monday in Kenton Circuit Court. It claims the criminal charges were brought in retaliation for Williams filing a federal civil rights lawsuit against the police. The federal case is pending in U.S. District Court in Covington.

I don’t know how you sue someone for malicious prosecution when their client already pled guilty,” said Kenton Commonwealth’s Attorney Rob Sanders, one of the defendants in the suit. “I guess a law license can be a dangerous thing in the hands of a crazy person.” This is the second time this year that one of Deters’ clients has filed a suit against Sanders claiming malicious prosecution. Fired Dayton High School teacher Nicole Howell filed a similar suit in federal court after she was found not guilty of having sex with a 16year-old student.

“It is another example, like Nicole Howell, of Rob Sanders and in this case, the Kenton County police going after someone with great malice,” Deters wrote in a press release.

Sanders said he could not address the allegations until he reads the suit. Sanders had not been served a copy of the suit as of Monday afternoon.

“I’ve never been sued by another defense attorney,” he said. “Obviously, I think everyone can see a pattern here.” Also named as defendants are Kenton County Police Chief Ed Butler and three of his officers.

The state suit asks for $5 million in compensatory damages and $10 million in punitive damages.

The suit claims Williams was shocked more than 20 times by a stun gun, sprayed with a chemical irritant and beaten with baton. He was then taken to the hospital but not arrested. Some of the struggle between Williams and officers was recorded on cameras mounted on police cruisers.

Williams wasn’t criminally charged until after he filed the civil suit in federal court more than 30 days later.

“The defendants, with malice, filed criminal charges against plaintiff without probable cause and with the sole purpose of attempting to coerce plaintiff to drop the civil lawsuit,” the state suit says.

Williams was ultimately found guilty of disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and second-degree wanton endangerment, a misdemeanor.

 

 

 

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